Dedicated to challenging professional actors to entertain and educate by bringing historically accurate characters alive using music, dance and drama. 

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RAVE REVIEWS & TESTIMONIALS

KID KUDOS

Old West Gets A New Look
by Heather Weant - CT Post

Billy the Kid, Doc Holliday and Annie Oakley are among the first names in Western folklore that readily come to mind.  But the tales of dust-kicking, cow-punching, steer-roping real-life black cowboys have emerged only recently.

Following the play, the three principles -- actor, director and writer -- engaged in a lively  question and answer session with the students.  One child asked, "Did Nat Love really punch cows?"  He was told "cow-punching" is slang for branding.  "These are questions only kids can ask,"  Hall [the actor] said.  "Kids tend to get right to the crux."  Hall also teaches in New Haven's Comprehensive Arts Program.  "One of the things I hope to teach through this show is not only the history of the black cowboys but also about the choices one has to make [in life].  I want them to see that there are consequences for wrong choices."

​​Chapel Street School, 5th Grade

"I felt I was in the scene when he was talking to me."  

"Cra Cra!" (translation: Crazy Amazing!)

"[History Alive] takes you back in time so you feel like you were there!"  

"I felt I was in the time zone." 

The Legend of Goody Basset
by Justin Brunetto - Stratford Star

Stressed in this brief biography is not the point of whether or not Goody Basset was a witch, or even the mockery of justice created by the witch trials.  The scene centralizes on Goody as an individual, unafraid to state her views and opinions; a precursor of the modern woman.

"What happened to Goody Basset in the end?" asked one student, as if he couldn't believe the travesty of the trial.

"What do you think happened?"  replied Steve Otfinoski, the writer.

"She was killed?"  This sparked a stimulating conversation on contemporary issues of intolerence, and the types of atrocities that were acceptable in our community three  centuries ago.  "Through the medium of the stage," said Otfinoski, "the children are introduced to concepts they can relate to, and more importantly, are encouraged to follow up on their reactions in the classroom."

"Actor Educates Students on Racial Injustice"
by Vallerie A. Malkin - Pictorial Gazette

The presentation which integrated performing arts, history and this year's school 
theme, "respect," is designed to increase student awareness and develop appreciation of the black experience and to understand its role in the nation's history.

"Greg Mouning deftly portrays Frederick Douglas, . . . passionately portrays his 
character as a man of bravery, character, and intelligence whose thirst for freedom is eventually quenched after 21 years of slavery . . . students and teachers applauded loud and long in appreciation for Mouning's portrayal of the two historical individuals."

Stressed in this brief biography is not the point of whether or not Goody Basset was a witch, or even the mockery of justice created by the witch trials.  The scene centralizes on Goody as an individual, unafraid to state her views and opinions; a precursor of the modern woman.

"What happened to Goody Basset in the end?" asked one student, as if he couldn't believe the travesty of the trial.

"What do you think happened?"  replied Steve Otfinoski, the writer

TWO FOR FREEEDOM
Kevin Kane - CT Post, Bridgeport

On Jack Arabus:  "As surely as George Washington and Thoms Jefferson, he was an American patriot, a man who served his country for six years during the Revolutionary War."

On Frederick Douglass:  "And just as Abraham Lincoln stirred the nation with the 
Gettysburg Address, so too did the oratory of an African-American touch the 
conscience of his fellow Americans."

"How come black people had to be slaves?"  When asked if he was "embarrassed" to portray a slave, Mouning said he was "very proud of this character because he used the justice system to get his freedom."